A wild child's fashion
A blog about fashion for kids, enchanting ideas, different styles. I love unique clothes and hope you enjoy them as much as I do.
~ proud aunt of three absolutely wonderful nephews (2009,2011,2012) <3

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themountainlaurel:

Elevate ~ by Amanda Tipton

themountainlaurel:

Elevate ~ by Amanda Tipton

Paade Mode

Paade Mode

Paade Mode

Paade Mode

Paul&amp;Paula blog: Kindred Oak A/W 2014 by Paul+Paula on Flickr.

Paul&Paula blog: Kindred Oak A/W 2014 by Paul+Paula on Flickr.

sibling kids room by Paul+Paula on Flickr.

sibling kids room by Paul+Paula on Flickr.

Spending the afternoon with J. today was exhausting but also really productive in a positive way.
Today he learned some more about numbers, colours, sizes and heights but also the nature in general.
He has started developing those interests when he was around 1 1/2 years old and now that he is 2 years and 3 months old we can take things to a whole new level.
By now he can name all colours without making any mistakes (even including more difficult colours like white and orange and purple) and can sort items depending on their colour and he absolutely loves doing so.
He can also count up to 4 items and grasp the meaning of “3 apples” or “4 pears” to a certain extent and will ask for help when needed.
Using his wooden fruits (from a game) to build a tower he also learned the meaning of same shapes and sizes in order to make the tower work and it’s great how easy it is to include those little “lessons” during playtime.
Later on we also talked about birds and the weather and changes in the nature during autumn and he was really concentrated and told stories about the nature outside the window while looking at all the little details of this season.
I feel like we’re finally at a stage where he asks things because he wants to make connections and truly understand the world around him on a deeper level because his behaviour and thoughts reflect so much of what he’s learning on a daily base.
We have never pushed him to learn something he wasn’t interested in and that’s why it’s even more amazing to see the process in his learning and his never-ending energy and curiousity!

PS: A post about development stages of children might follow soon!

soul-wanderer:

{Natural play} oh how wonderful it is to have a children’s room void of things that make annoying sounds. The only thing making sounds is the CD player and a xylophone and it’s such a wonderful feeling. He loves to play with his stuffed animals, loves to read, build things with Lego (one of the rare plastic items actually) and loved the chestnuts he collected. It’s amazing to see his imagination run wild and it once again shows that children don’t need any modern entertainment devices/toys to have the time of their lives!

soul-wanderer:

{Natural play} oh how wonderful it is to have a children’s room void of things that make annoying sounds. The only thing making sounds is the CD player and a xylophone and it’s such a wonderful feeling. He loves to play with his stuffed animals, loves to read, build things with Lego (one of the rare plastic items actually) and loved the chestnuts he collected. It’s amazing to see his imagination run wild and it once again shows that children don’t need any modern entertainment devices/toys to have the time of their lives!

I’m not quite sure where I’m going to end up with this post but since it seems like a much discussed topic lately I thought I could share a bit of my story with you.
Looking back I realized that I’m probably the perfect example for a gender-neutral childhood.
I barely ever wore dresses/skirts and instead had clothes in green/yellow/blue/red colours and wore a lot of jeans and cargos and I think the only time my parents ever told me to wear a dress was for my first day of school and otherwise I was pretty much free to choose what I wanted to wear since I always went with them when I needed new clothes.
I had very few dolls, and rarely played with them anyway, and a lot of stuffed animals, Lego, Playmobil, and a pretend kitchen (that wasn’t pink). 
I played outside, got dirty and would come home with various scratches after a long day of running round.
Even though my first “hobby” was dancing (not ballet), soccer, martial arts and hockey soon followed next to it and my parents always encouraged me to do what I was interested in.
My room was neither girly nor boyish and instead painted yellow with simple wooden interior and child-friendly pictures and decoration.
As far as I remember I was never told that something was for girls or boys only and most of the time my birthday/christmas wishes were pretty much gender-neutral as well.
Today I still prefer “neutral” colours, love my jeans/cargos but also have an abundant collection of dresses and skirts and you might even find one or the other pink item if you look closely.
Being an aunt I love gender-neutral gifts and encourage my nephews to do things they like even if they’re considered to be “girlish” because I want them to understand that it doesn’t matter as long as they’re enjoying themselves.
I also sit down with the kids I’m working with when they say things like “that’s for girls/boys only” or insult someone else with saying that they’re such girls/boys because they do something that isn’t considered a boys/girls activity because I want them to understand that it’s not okay to hurt/attack someone else for something they like/enjoy doing.
Some boys in our group enjoy handcrafting and some girls enjoy racing around with the boys and it’s so important to make a difference and show children the right way instead of teaching them hate and encouraging close-mindedness because nothing is worse than letting the next generations make the same mistakes past generations made over and over again! 

el_hogan

el_hogan

el_hogan 

el_hogan